Gravity Data

DIAS Geophysics has collected and continues to manage terrestrial gravity data In Ireland.

Since the establishment of the Geophysics Section, gravity measurements were taken at over 23,000 stations (Thirlaway 1951, Murphy 1952, 1974; , O’Reilly et al., 1996, Readman et al., 1997).  The data coverage shown averages at about 4.2 stations per 10 km square, equivalent to an average spacing of about 1.55 km. The measurements have usually been made at or near to Ordnance Survey of Ireland bench marks or spot heights, and terrain corrections (rarely greater than 0.5 mGal) have been made where necessary. To view gravity station locations click here.

bouger_anomaly

The overall accuracy is estimated to be about 0.2 mGal. The variation in the thickness of the overburden cover leads to uncertainty in calculating the Bouguer anomaly that in extreme cases can be up to 1.5 mGal for peat bog. The magnitude of the effect is rarely known so for simplicity the data reduction procedure in calculating the Bouguer anomaly has assumed a constant density of 2670 kg m -3 above sea-level datum.

Commercial data licence fee

€0.30 per point (for one year licence) + €250 licensing fee and €250 data preparation fee.

Multi-year licences are possible up to a maximum of 5-years, with approximately 50% reduction for each successive year so a 2 year licence is €0.45 per point, 3 year licence is €0.525 per point, 4 year licence is €0.5625 per point, and a 5 year licence is €0.60 per point.

For further details and price quotations contact geosecretary-at-cp.dias.ie. To view the agreement letter please click here.

Academic use

The gravity data can be made freely available to academic users upon request.

For further details contact geosecretary-at-cp.dias.ie. To view the agreement letter please click here.

Publication References

Murphy, T. 1952. – Measurements of gravity in Ireland: Gravity survey of Central Ireland. Geophysical Memoirs, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, No. 2, part 2.

Murphy, T. 1974. – Gravity Anomaly Map of Ireland. Communications of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Series D, Geophysical Bulletin No. 32.

O’Reilly, B.M., Readman, P.W. & Murphy, T. 1996. The gravity signature of Caledonian and Variscan tectonics in Ireland. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 21, 299-304.

Readman, P.W., O’Reilly, B.M. & Murphy, T. 1997. Gravity gradients and upper crustal tectonic fabrics, Ireland. Journal of the Geological Society, London 154, 817-828.

Thirlaway, H.I.S. 1951. – Measurements of gravity in Ireland: Gravimeter observations between Dublin, Sligo, Galway and Cork. Geophysical Memoirs, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Ireland, No. 2, part 3.

T. Blake from DIAS Geo discussing Irish earthquakes on BBC Radio Ulster (in Irish) bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05…

DIAS Geophysics scholars join their colleagues at the 2017 DIAS Research Forum

test Twitter Media - DIAS Geophysics scholars join their colleagues at the 2017 DIAS Research Forum https://t.co/q7vD9gPXZP

Dr Florian LePape presents his results on seismic noise in the geomarine environment offshore Ireland @iCRAGcentre @MarineInst #EGU17

test Twitter Media - Dr Florian LePape presents his results on seismic noise in the geomarine environment offshore Ireland @iCRAGcentre @MarineInst #EGU17 https://t.co/BbtrmcCJ8q

@dias_geophysics scholar, Andrea Licciardi has been awarded with the OSPP (Oustanding Student Poster and PICO) at #EGU17 in Vienna

test Twitter Media - @dias_geophysics scholar, Andrea Licciardi has been awarded with the OSPP (Oustanding Student Poster and PICO) at #EGU17 in Vienna https://t.co/0rQ5Eg5yGR